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Monthly Archives: August 2017

Take Good Beach Photos

You can ask your traveling companion who is holding the camera to capture your turning around moment with a big smile and looking straight at the camera. Capturing the exactly turning moment is the key to make this pose successful, which requires privity between you and the photographer.

Back facing the camera, you can fondle your hair with your left hand and take your large brim hat with the right hand. Your should face towards the direction of the wind at beach, so your hair and brim hat will sway like dancing along with the wind. What a beautiful moment that would be!

When the sunshine become soft at dusk, you can capture the scene when the sun is sitting in the horizon of the sea. Stand on your toes and ask your partner to squat, with the sunset ornament your body, you would become part of the beautiful sight.

You can make a good use of the sands. Sands can be the easiest tool for taking beach photos. Actually it can be very useful for many poses. Today I recommend you this simple one: just fiddle up the sands and shoot the exact moment when they are spreading down, PS with a nostalgic grounding color, your eyes won’t want to leave such a picture in the photo albums.

Digital Compact Camera

The only real limit is you! – photography is a marvelous hobby as you can enjoy yourself at whatever level of interest or expertise that appeals to you.

Should you want to get more creative with your ‘simple’ camera there are a lot of things which you can do… the obvious start point is the instruction manual – this is a mine of useful information – it just takes a little perseverance – don’t try and learn it all at once! Just look up what you need to know now.

When you take a photograph with your camera in the ‘automatic’ mode it will produce what the manufacturer considers to be the best picture based on all the information available to the camera – such as the light; the type of light; the type of scene the camera calculates is in front of it; is it using the flash and so on. However the camera is just guessing, albeit very cleverly, about the picture it is taking.

You, however, know what type of picture you are taking – people, scenery, buildings etc and if you just tell your camera what you are doing it will be able to do a better calculation and produce a better picture for you.

How do we do this? Built into your camera are a set of different ‘modes’ or ‘scenes’. By selecting one of these we tell the camera what the picture is all about and it will calculate the exposure accordingly – it really is that simple. Your instruction book will tell you how to turn on modes really quickly – it is so easy! Just remember to turn the camera back to automatic afterwards to avoid taking a whole lot of pictures at the wrong settings.

On most cameras there are a multitude of different modes as the manufacturers compete to add features. At first sight this can be quite daunting – do not get mode gridlock! Pick two or three that you really find useful such as ‘Portrait’ or ‘Landscape’ and concentrate on these – practice with them and get an idea of the effects you can achieve. You will be so impressed with yourself!

Once you are comfortable with these you can start to increase the number that you use. Don’t be cautious about experimenting – the more you try the more confident and comfortable you will become with your camera and your pictures will improve considerably. You will get just so much more fun out of your hobby.

Cleaning Camera Sensor

1. Camera cleaning mode

Most digital cameras have a sensor cleaning mode and this is what you should always try first before going for any other type of cleaning. You should remove the lens and then aim your camera downwards when engaging the cleaning mode. This way, dislodged dust and dirt will fall out easily. The sensor cleaning mode is sometimes all you need to have a clean sensor, but you might need to employ other cleaning options if this does not yield the results that you expect.

2. Air blower

Bulb blowers make other very good tools to help you clean the camera sensor. Choose larger blowers to get rid of dust from the sensor, but never ever use air that is compressed and canned on the sensor because your risk fluid damage. When using the blower, point the camera downward to the ground so the dust can fall off the camera. The blowers use clean air paths ensuring that blown dust doesn’t get sucked back and re-deposited on the camera.

3. Sensor gel stick

A sensor gel stick and a senor brush have the same function. They are negatively charged and therefore pull dust particles off the camera sensor as compared to moving them all over the sensor. It is advisable not to press down the stick or brush on the sensor because passing over the sensor is good enough to attract the dust. Some have LED lights that help you see how you are cleaning. When getting your gel stick, ensure that it is compatible with your camera. You can choose the gel stick or the brush, whatever you feel works best for you.

White Balance Important

Most of us just leave the White Balance setting on ‘automatic’ and the camera does a pretty good job of estimating the correct setting and we are generally happy with the results.

However, if we really want to improve our photography and add our own individual touches to our images it is really well worth experimenting with the various white balance settings available on your camera – AWB (automatic) Cloudy, Daylight (Bright Sun) Shade, Tungsten etc – and seeing the difference they can make to your pictures. Remember, you know what the prevailing light is. Your camera can only guess!

If you experiment with these, you will soon be able to see how to make the best use of them to help your photography. For example, if you use the ‘cloudy’ setting, even when it is not cloudy, it will have the effect of ‘warming up’ the picture – great for sunsets! The automatic setting may well remove most of that wonderful glow you wanted to capture.

The wonder of Digital Photography is that you can experiment freely at no cost – play around and experiment with your camera to your heart’s content – the more familiar you become the better you will get at taking pictures that actually reflect what you have seen and which are not just ‘postcard clones’ as it were!

Continual experimentation is one of the key secrets of digital photography. It can take people some time to get out of the habits of film photography where it cost money each time you pressed the shutter button! Once again – time spent reading the instruction manual for your camera will pay serious dividends in helping you to really enjoy your photography!